Canada

Federal Skilled Worker Eligibility Through Express Entry System 

Canadian Employers Become Non-Compliant

How Canadian Citizenship is Acquired?

Canadian citizenship is obtained by birth in Canada or when at least one biological parent is a Canadian citizen. If a non-Canadian individual wants to become a permanent resident of Canada, he/she need to live in Canada for 4 years before applying for Canadian citizenship. Recommended: Procedure to Apply for Canadian Immigration by Express Entry

Can the Skilled Workers Reside in Canada Become Permanent Residents?

Yes, they can, the skilled workers who are residing on a temporary visa in Canada and wants to become a permanent Canadian resident, the Canadian Government provides them with an opportunity to become permanent by looking out their useful skills such as.

  1. By reviewing their educational background.
  2. Checking and validating their financial status.
  3. Skills and work experience and as well as;
  4. Knowledge of languages (English and French are required).

To apply for permanent residency, the Canadian government introduced the easiest and reliable way of Express Entry in 2015 for skilled workers. Read more: Requirements to Become a Permanent Resident of Canada

Programs That Fall Under Express Entry System

  1. Federal Skilled worker Program.
  2. Federal Skilled Trades Program.
  3. Canadian Experience Class.

Skilled Worker Eligibility

The requirements under the Federal Skilled Worker program are as follows:

  • Skilled work experience (minimum of 1-year experience is required).
  • Good Language ability. (This will be assessed by the reliable and authorized testing procedures).
  • Education background (Minimum High School).
  • Age (Generally more favorable if you are below 40 years old).
  • A valid job offer (If an employer has offered you a position in Canada).
  • English and/or French language skills (If you passed necessary English language skills).
  • Adaptability (your likelihood of settling in Canada).

Scaling will be from a 100-point grid to assess eligibility for the Federal Skilled Worker Program and the current pass mark is 67 points, it means a candidate should gain 67 out of 100 points in order to succeed. Read more: 17 Ways Canadian Employers Become Non-Compliant

Proof of Funds

Applicant must be able to demonstrate holding enough money for them and their family to settle in Canada or the valid source of income is mentioned such as currently able to legally work in Canada or have a valid job offer from an employer in Canada.

Detailed Demands for Federal Skilled Worker Applicants

1). Skilled Work Experience

Skilled work experience means that an individual has worked in one of these National Occupational classifications (NOC) job groups:

  1. Managerial jobs (Skill type 0).
  2. Professional jobs (Skill level A).
  3. Technical jobs and skilled trades (Skill level B).

a). Your skilled work experience must be:

  1. Your experience should be in the same type of job (have the same NOC) as the job you mentioned for your immigration application.
  2. Paid work is required, Volunteer work or unpaid internships are not countable.
  3. At least 1 year of continuous work or 1,560 hours total (30 hours per week).

2). Language Skills

An applicant should pass language tests in English or French for:

  1. Writing.
  2. Reading.
  3. Listening.
  4. Speaking.

3). Educational Framework

Applicant must show his certificate, diploma or degree from the institution.

  1. Secondary (High School).
  2. Post-secondary school (Bachelors).

Admissibility

Candidates must be admissible to Canada. This means that they are not a security risk, cleared the medical exam and not having a criminal history or blacklisted by any country. And even be careful that your spouse doesn’t contain any criminal records as it can affect your application. Read more: 9 Facts You Need to Know About Canadian Life

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Source: Government of Canada

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